Monday, March 8th 2021

Intel Plans a Sizable 11th Gen Core "Tiger Lake-H" Mobile Processor Lineup

Intel's new 8-core "Tiger Lake" silicon will play a major role in holding the company's dominance in the mobile processor space, with plans for new 6-core and 8-core SKUs being in motion. OneRaichu on Twitter, a reliable source with Intel leaks, points to several unreleased model numbers. The 8-core "Tiger Lake-H" die is expected to be built on the same 10 nm SuperFin process as the "Tiger Lake-U" silicon. The lineup is led by the Core i9-11980HK, an 8-core/16-thread processor that uses eight "Willow Cove" CPU cores, 2.60 GHz nominal- and 5.00 GHz max-Turbo frequency, and 3.30 GHz AVX512 frequency. This chip will be in a class of its own, as its TDP is rated at 65 W, significantly above the 35-45 W TDP range that constitutes the H-segment. It will likely power large gaming notebooks with elaborate cooling solutions. It will also come with an unlocked base-clock multiplier.

The Core i9-11900H is the next chip in the lineup, with slightly lower clock speeds of 2.50 GHz base, 4.90 GHz max-Turbo, and 2.10 GHz AVX512. This chip features a much lower 35 W TDP, and will come with aggressive power management compared to the i9-11980HK. The Core i7-11800H will be the slowest 8-core part, with clock speeds of 2.40 GHz nominal, 4.60 GHz max-Turbo, and 2.00 GHz AVX512. It comes with the same 35 W TDP as the i9-11900H. Next up, are 6-core/12-thread parts, likely under the Core i5 brand. These include the i5-11400H, clocked at 2.70 GHz nominal, 4.50 GHz max-Turbo, and 2.20 GHz AVX512. At the bottom of the pile is the i5-11260H, clocked at 2.60 GHz, with 4.40 GHz max-Turbo, and 2.10 GHz AVX512. Both Core i5 parts are 35-Watt.
Sources: OneRaichu (Twitter), via VideoCardz
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14 Comments on Intel Plans a Sizable 11th Gen Core "Tiger Lake-H" Mobile Processor Lineup

#2
_JP_
That or most board designs have single-channel memory for AMD platforms. In this day and age.
Posted on Reply
#3
yotano211
Why would the 8 core laptop processors be rated at 35w, when its always been at 45w. Top rated laptop processors have always been rated at 45w. The older "xm" processors where rated at 55w, but 11th gen's top cpu is at 65w.
Is intel changing their TDP ratings for the 11th gen?
Posted on Reply
#4
P4-630
btarunr
its TDP is rated at 65 W
They better have a really decent way of cooling this CPU, especially if they pair it with a 3080 or the like...


A detachable tower cooler would help...
Posted on Reply
#5
yotano211
P4-630
They better have a really decent way of cooling this CPU, especially if they pair it with a 3080 or the like...


A detachable tower cooler would help...
They dont need to change anything. The processor in my current laptop, i9 9880h turbos upto 65w.
Posted on Reply
#6
P4-630
yotano211
They dont need to change anything. The processor in my current laptop, i9 9880h turbos upto 65w.
It must throttle hard when doing something intensive no? What are your temps while gaming?
Posted on Reply
#7
yotano211
P4-630
It must throttle hard when doing something intensive no? What are your temps while gaming?
I use liquid metal for TIM, its maxs out at 3.9ghz, running at 85C. The running max, 100%, is 3.9ghz with .110v undervolt
Posted on Reply
#8
Vayra86
yotano211
Why would the 8 core laptop processors be rated at 35w, when its always been at 45w. Top rated laptop processors have always been rated at 45w. The older "xm" processors where rated at 55w, but 11th gen's top cpu is at 65w.
Is intel changing their TDP ratings for the 11th gen?
Maybe this is where their new node pays off.
Posted on Reply
#9
TheinsanegamerN
Vayra86
Maybe this is where their new node pays off.
Highly doubt it, 10nm still seems to have major yeild problems. They wouldnt have backported their new core design to 14nm if 10nm was doing well.
Posted on Reply
#10
Vayra86
TheinsanegamerN
Highly doubt it, 10nm still seems to have major yeild problems. They wouldnt have backported their new core design to 14nm if 10nm was doing well.
"The 8-core "Tiger Lake-H" die is expected to be built on the same 10 nm SuperFin process as the "Tiger Lake-U" silicon."

But yeah. We can't say its impossible some turbo trickery is involved.
Posted on Reply
#11
Vader
yotano211
Why would the 8 core laptop processors be rated at 35w, when its always been at 45w. Top rated laptop processors have always been rated at 45w. The older "xm" processors where rated at 55w, but 11th gen's top cpu is at 65w.
Is intel changing their TDP ratings for the 11th gen?
HK cpus were always meant to go in big, "desktop replacement" laptops. In these models the cpu was often allowed to boost far past the 45 watt TDP, and TBH that was the main difference vs the non- HK part.
I'd say that intel stating that the 11980HK is a 65W cpu is a good thing. If anything, it will prevent these parts from going into thin and light premium laptops, which is frankly ridiculous and a waste of money if you ask me
Posted on Reply
#12
Tom Yum
That Intel dominance....from techspot

Posted on Reply
#13
Arc1t3ct
Core i9-11980HK, an 8-core/16-thread processor...3.30 GHz AVX512 frequency.
It will likely power large gaming notebooks with elaborate cooling solutions.
This is very confusing... Which games make use of AVX512?
Posted on Reply
#14
watzupken
I don't know if sizable 11th Gen Core line up is desirable. To me, this is just the usual Intel way of slicing and dicing their products such that for every tiny incremental improvement, they want you to pay more. Tiger Lake H is limited to 8 cores with its max configuration, so I don't see the point of creating too many SKUs of 4, 6 and 8 cores, and now further segmented by different iGPU configurations. And typically as we see in many reviews out there, the difference is mostly at the clockspeed level. However reviews out there also confirms that the higher clocked version typically don't do well due to insufficient cooling in laptops.
Vayra86
"The 8-core "Tiger Lake-H" die is expected to be built on the same 10 nm SuperFin process as the "Tiger Lake-U" silicon."

But yeah. We can't say its impossible some turbo trickery is involved.
I think he is referring to the fact that if Intel did not have 10nm yield issues, then they would have delivered the same 10nm Tiger Lake to desktop instead of utilizing 14nm for their new Rocket Lake.
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